Oshima's Outlaw Sixties: Eclipse From The Criterion Collection

Criterion   / Region 1
Review
Wishlist
Oshimas Outlaw Sixties: Eclipse From The Criterion Collection

Sign In to hide.

DVD
  Free Shipping
Free Shipping
Orders of $25.00 or more will be shipped our Standard Shipping option and the shipping is completely FREE. Learn more

Buy DVD
In Stock
In Stock: Ships Immediately
Product is In Stock at our warehouse, ready for immediate shipment if ordered before 3pm ET.
$52.58

Oshima's Outlaw Sixties: Eclipse From The Criterion Collection

Often called the Godard of the East, Japanese director Nagisa Oshima was one of the most provocative film artists of the twentieth century, and his works challenged and shocked the cinematic world for decades. Following his rise to prominence at Shochiku, Oshima struck out to form his own production company, Sozosha, in 1961. That move ushered in the prolific period of his career that gave birth to the five films collected here. Unsurprisingly, this studio renegade was fascinated by stories of outsiders - serial killers, rabid hedonists, and stowaway misfits are just some of the social castoffs you'll meet in these audacious, cerebral entries in the New Wave surge that made Japan a hub of truly daredevil moviemaking.

Films Include

Pleasures Of The Flesh (Etsuraku)

A corrupt businessman blackmails a lovelorn murderer, Atsushi, into watching over his suitcase full of embezzled cash while he serves a jail sentence. Rather than wait for the man to retrieve his money, however, Atsushi decides to spend it all in one libidinous rush - fully expecting to be tracked down and killed. Oshima's dip into the waters of the popular soft-core, or "pink film," genre is a compelling journey into excess.

Violence At Noon (Hakuchu no torima)

Oshima's disturbing tale concerns the odd circumstances surrounding a horrific murder and spree. In an unexpected twist, the film is as much about the two women who protect the violent man - his wife and a former victim - as it is about him. Containing more than two thousand cuts and a wealth of inventive widescreen compositions, this coolly fragmented character study is a mesmerizing investigation of criminality and social decay.

Sing A Song Of Sex (Nihon shunka-ko)

In Oshima's enigmatic tale, four sexually hungry high school students preparing for their university entrance exams meet up with an inebriated teacher singing bawdy drinking songs. This encounter sets them on a less than academic path. Oshima's , free-form depiction of generational political apathy features stunning color cinematography.

Japanese Summer: Double Suicide (Muri shinju: Nihon no natsu)

A sex-obsessed young woman, a suicidal young man she meets on the street, a gun-crazy wannabe gangster - these are just three of the irrational, oddball anarchists trapped in an underground hideaway in Oshima's devilish, absurdist portrait of what he deemed the "death drive" in Japanese youth culture.

Three Resurrected Drunkards (Kaette kita yopparai)

A trio of bumbling young men frolic at the beach. While they swim, their clothes are stolen and replaced with new outfits. Having donned these, they are mistaken for undocumented Koreans and end up on the run from comically outraged authorities. A cutting commentary on Japan's treatment of its Korean immigrants, this is Oshima at both his most politically engaged and madcap.

Details

  • Length
  • Rating NR
  • Released:
  • Added Feb 17 2010
  • Empire SKU 1521269
  • UPC Code 715515059619
  • Studio  Criterion
  • Packaging Custom
  • Number of Discs 5
  • Disc SS-DL
  • Subtitles English

Features

Features Not Specified

Audio/Video

  • Audio
    Japanese Dolby Digital Mono
  • Video
    Widescreen 1.85:1 B&W (Anamorphic)
    Widescreen 1.85:1 Color (Anamorphic)

Review "Oshima's Outlaw Sixties: Eclip"

Film Rating
(Slide to Set Rating)

1
5
5 


Alias is displayed publicly
All submitted comments become the sole property of DVD Empire. DVD Empire reserves the right to not post this comment for any reason.
   or     Cancel

Reviews for "Oshima's Outlaw Sixties: Eclip"